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Alfonso CuarónEdit

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • You're the new boy in all this. Your producer David Heyman called you a teenager at heart. Is that why you were picked to direct this film?
    • Well, teenagers recognise other teenagers. From the moment I read the material, it was something that I connected with. This is the story of a kid who is seeking his identity as a teenager and I felt it was something I knew how to make into a film.
  • Were you surprised to be asked?
    • I was amused about the whole thing. I was amused because it would have made perfect sense if I'd been asked after a little film I did called The Little Princess, but it came right after I did Y Tu Mamá También.
  • How was did the three principals react to you as the new director?
    • Something happened with the three of them that I think also happened with the rest of the actors. Because of my bad English, they would do what they thought I'd said, not what I had actually said [laughs]. And that was to the benefit of the film.
  • Were the kids intimidated by working with the likes of Gary Oldman?
    • From my perspective, I found the grown-ups more intimidated by the kids. They'd done two movies, they are doing this movie, they are working every single day. Then Gary comes in from a different universe. I think it was tough for him.
  • Could you comment on the choice of Michael Seresin as cinematographer? Most of his films have this gritty look, particularly his Alan Parker films, and this one looks dark - even darker than the first two films...
    • All my life I collaborated with Emmanuel Lubezki - he did my films, and also films like Sleepy Hollow - but he wasn't available. For the first time ever I found myself looking for a different cinematographer, and actually Emmanuel was a big factor in choosing Michael Seresin. We talked about him as a cinematographer we always admired, and one who we tried to emulate in many ways. One thing that I felt was perfect for Michael was that we have this magical universe that he could really ground. Because he has got that grittiness, and that grittiness comes from the fact that he is a single-source light cinematographer. He's very naturalistic in that sense. I felt it would be a good marriage with the material. He also turned out to be an amazing guy and an amazing collaborator, and I think that the combination between Michael Seresin and Stuart Craig [production designer] is what put this universe together.
  • Did you ever feel the need to reign in some of the darkness, or were you told that you could push it a bit further?
    • From the get-go we set up to serve the material, and I think that the darkness comes out of the material. There is an evolution between the first film and the second film that is also a result of the material, and now this new darkness has come up from Harry's perception in which the world is changing. Some of the monsters are not outside, the monsters are inside, but also the antidote for the monsters is inside. So we were trying to add darkness, to balance the darkness present in the book. What is so beautiful about these books is the dance of the darkness - the scary, emotional elements - and humour. That is what we were trying to honour.
  • As a Mexican, how did you give such a British atmosphere to the film?
    • The Britishness was kind of easy because it was so obvious in the material, so strong in the material. The thing that made it even easier was that I inherited a universe, not in the books, but it was already set into films. I was inheriting what Chris [Columbus] put together in the first two films. When I started I had it easy, everything was already in place. I just came here to have fun. You have to talk to Chris, because he had to build the kitchen, buy the food, get the recipes and start cooking. I arrived and the kitchen was there, the food was there, the recipes were there and not only that, the chef was there from the previous two meals telling you "watch out for the oven because at 350 it's not working so well". The only thing that I did myself was to serve the material, but I was serving it from a very comfortable standpoint.


Bonnie WrightEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • When did you first read the "Harry Potter" books, and what did you think of them?
    • I had a few of them before we started the first movie and I was a very big fan then. I thought they were great books and my brother always said I was a lot like Ginny!
  • What was the best moment of the shoot for you?
    • Just going to the studio every day was great. All the sets were wonderful and I liked every scene.
  • What was it like working with Julie Walters as on your on-screen mum?
    • She's a really great person and she's really funny. They were both really ideal screen parents [Mark Williams plays Arthur Weasley], because they're not mean in any way and they don't act as if you're a fake daughter or son.
  • How have you found the pressures of stardom?
    • I have had a few people recognise me in public. But I wouldn't like everybody to recognise me. I can still walk across the street and not be noticed. If I was Daniel Radcliffe I think I would find it much harder to deal with.
  • What advice have your friends given you?
    • My friends and family have been really proud of me and always talking about the film. For me, it's a really nice thing to have a lot of people supporting you through the actual thing.
  • If you could cast a spell, what would it be?
    • If I wanted to cast a bad one, I'd definitely do it to someone I didn't like. I like the spell in the first film when Dudley Dursley gets a pig's tail. That was quite funny. I suppose it's not really a spell, but I'd like to fly a broom in real life. That would be really cool.

Half-Blood PrinceEdit

  • Do you remember how you felt when you read “The Half-Blood Prince”?
    • I wasn’t fully expecting what happened. Ginny had grown up so much in the sixth book, and what happens between her and Harry? I just couldn’t have imagined that would happen. She started out so shy and young, and in this book she’s gotten so much more confident and noticed. She finds herself and it’s the first time you realize why she becomes the person who ends up with Harry.
  • The book came out in 2005. You were just 15 – did you feel apprehensive, knowing that you’d soon be playing Harry’s love interest?
    • It was weird. Just reading what happens to her, but then after I’d really thought about everything I thought, ‘Oh God, we’re going to have to film all of those things.’ That was quite nerve-wracking. But you always know the way they write the script very much captures the mood of what’s happening in a good way. In a comfortable way.
  • In the book, Harry and Ginny spontaneously kiss while celebrating a Quidditch match. Does that match how it plays out in the movie?
    • It’s actually different in the film. Their relationship sort of slowly builds and there’s this tension between them. Just when you think the kiss is going to happen, it doesn’t. It’s really a sweet tale of how they’re slowly getting drawn to one another. Obviously, it’s very difficult for Harry with Ginny being his best friend’s younger sister. But the kiss itself happens in a much more intimate environment. It’s just the two of them rather than in the midst of the Gryffindor common room celebrating Quidditch. It’s a bit quieter in the film.
  • Why the change?
    • I think David really wanted a different kind of moment in the film. There’s lots of humor and dark moments this time, and I think he wanted the story of Ginny and Harry to weave between all of that to break it up a bit. He wanted their story and its atmosphere to stand out. He wanted it to be much quieter. People are eager for it too, when it finally comes.
  • Can you set up the scene?
    • At this point in the film, Harry has become really taken over by this Half Blood Prince book and obviously Ginny can relate to that, having that happen to her in the second film [with Tom Riddle’s diary.] So she really notices what’s happening with him and how powerful and seductive this book can become. So they decide to hide it together, and the kiss happens when they’re going to hide the book.
  • How was working with Daniel Radcliffe leading up to the scene?
    • We talked about it a lot -- me, Dan and David Yates -- and we had a few rehearsals about how we wanted each of these moments leading up to the kiss between Ginny and Harry to work. Harry’s got a very different relationship with her in this film than he’s had with her in the past. Then she was like a younger sister. So it was important that Dan and I could work out what the relationship meant together. He was great about it.
  • How does Ron work himself into their relationship?
    • There are a few awkward moments. He and Ginny don’t really have the courage to get it in words. There’s a really funny scene during Christmas at the Weasley house and there’s this part where I’m talking to Harry and Ron interrupts, and quite purposely separates us physically. It’s a really funny moment in the film.
  • Tell me about the Quidditch.
    • There’s a lot of Quidditch in this film and I think you see a lot of Ginny’s confidence come through, that as well as an undercurrent of her competitive, even overconfident self.
  • What about the filming? Fun or painful?
    • I’d heard a lot of stories. Some had said, ‘Oh, it’s the most horrible thing,’ and others said it was really fun. I thought it was quite scary. I’m not afraid of heights but they manage to get you quite high on these complex hydraulic broomstick systems. It’s mad! You actually have to do quite a lot of the action yourself, being jerked around and spun around. It’s not all done by computer. It was also quite difficult when you’re pretending to play a complex game which you’re meant to be flying at so many hundred speeds an hour and really you’re on a studio set on a broomstick with blue screen around you. It can be hard to sort of connect.
  • How did the finished product look?
    • The way they put it together looks amazing. It moves so quickly, it looks almost impossible. I mean, it almost seems like it wasn’t us doing it because I know I wasn’t doing it that slickly.

Deathly HallowsEdit

  • Has it hit you yet that the films are coming to an end?
    • Yeah, you really cherish being on set even more. I’ve got a while yet. It probably won’t really hit me until the last few months of filming. It’s been so long for us all but I think it will be sad when we finish. I had a similar experience reading the last book. I was quite sad. I’ll miss being on set with all the people, and that energy. It’s such a big crew and big cast, so many characters. The energy is just amazing on set. And we’ve all gotten to work with so many of the greats. In terms of British film, you’ve probably got half of the great actors and cameramen and crew. Everyone is the top of their field on the film. “Sorcerer’s Stone” was the first film I ever did, so I definitely jumped in on the deep end.


Chris ColumbusEdit

Philosopher's StoneEdit

  • What were the main attributes that you wanted to remain in the film?
    • When I read the book, I saw the film in my head - which sounds like one of those typical clichéd Hollywood answers. I saw this film, I wanted to make this film, and I was obsessed. The three things I said to the studio and [producer] David Heyman when I first met them were: "I want it to be an all-British cast; shoot it all in England; and we have to remain as faithful to the book as time will allow." If you're going to do Shakespeare, you don't mess around with it, you don't touch it.
  • Given that millions of people already know the story, was it necessary to be secretive with the script?
    • It was an amazing conversation with the studio. They were going, "Maybe we should put the script in a library, and you have to go in and read it as if you were reading a library book." We had this ongoing argument, because we kept saying in the press: "We're being incredibly faithful to the book." My theory was, If you read the script, it's like reading a condensed version of the book. It's kind of a joke to me that there's this veil of secrecy to the script.
  • How would you describe your relationship with JK Rowling?
    • She was a collaborator, which I guess would be like a writer or a producer. She never held a stick over our heads and said: "You must do it this way." We would show her drawings of the Great Hall, we would get input from her on things like the Quidditch pitch, every aspect of the film. To me it was idiotic not to, it was stupid. I didn't feel hampered artistically, it was artistically liberating. As a director you want information, you try to get information. She's one of the best collaborators I've ever worked with.
  • Do you think there's a chance that the "Harry Potter" movie will usurp the books?
    • To me the film should be a companion piece to the book. When we showed the picture to people at previews, we showed it to 50% Harry Potter fans and 50% non-readers. The fans loved the movie - even though there were things not in the book; the non-readers loved the movie, but they were inclined to go out and buy the books. If the film inspires people to go out and buy the books, that's fantastic. We're not looking to overtake the book, and that's never going to happen, the books are too wonderful.
  • How do you build up the energy for a sequel?
    • That's a good question, because we're starting production three days after we open this picture [on 19th November] But honestly I think it's a matter of working with the same cast and crew again. I thrive on working with these people, because they have an energy and enthusiasm that's absolutely inspiring. Also, I don't look at it as a sequel. I value the quality of each of these books, and there are things I love about each of them and am obsessed about with each of them. So I look forward to doing the second movie. I look forward to doing the third movie if, physically, I can accomplish that.
  • Was it hard to cut out the character of Peeves [the mischievous ghoul played by Rik Mayall], and will he be on the DVD?
    • The reason he was cut is that none of us were happy with the design. David [Heyman] and I looked at the design of Peeves and thought, We can get it better. So we shot the sequence but we won't have it ready for the initial release of the DVD. We'll try and get it out for maybe a year and a half, two years, from now.

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • Was it easier to do the film second-time round?
    • It was a lot easier. On the second film we really just had more fun. It was intense, because I wanted to make a film that was better than the first time. I felt slightly more confident, I know the young actors felt more confident - you can see it in their performances. We were able to improvise, which we were never able to do on the first film.
  • Did you take in any reaction to "Philosopher's Stone" in the course of doing "Chamber of Secrets"?
    • Not really. We really didn't have time to even think about the reaction, which was probably good for the kids [the actors] as well as those of us making the film. "Philosopher's Stone" opened on the Friday and we were back filming "Chamber of Secrets" on the Monday. We always knew "Chamber of Secrets" would be stylistically a little different from "Philosopher's Stone" - it was a darker picture, edgier, with a bit more of an action-adventure/suspense slant. The first movie had 45 minutes of introduction. We immediately get into the story this time, which I think makes a huge difference.
  • How did you squeeze the novel down into the script?
    • I think the biggest omission was not to keep the Death Day party in the movie, which was one of our favourite scenes from the book. I think the film would have lost some of its intense pacing by putting that sequence in. We knew with "Chamber of Secrets" that we had two opportunities for action sequences, and that's really what attracted me to the story. I always ask the kids on set, "What's your favourite "Harry Potter" book?" The "Chamber of Secrets" is rarely mentioned. And it's a great book because it's got one of the strongest and simplest stories to translate to screen. It also enables you to take sequences - the basilisk sequence, the spider sequence - and turn them into full-fledged action sequences, which to me as a filmmaker was just so exciting. I was like an eight-year-old kid again, I couldn't wait to get to the set the days we were shooting those scenes.
  • Can the child actors play their characters in all seven movies?
    • Logically it's going to take us longer to do the third than it has the first two films, which we've basically shot back-to-back. In the books, as you well know, the kids get progressively older, so they could presumably play the roles for all seven films. It's really up to them, and how much excitement and stamina and energy they have.
  • Did the sheer scale of working with so many special effects ever compromise your ability to work with the actors?
    • Not really. The one thing I learned on the first film, and the one thing I wanted to improve upon on the second film, were the visual effects, I felt we could have done better. We had three months on the first film; we shot all of the visual effects scenes first for "Chamber of Secrets", giving us eight to nine months. I think the effects are much better on this film. I realised after doing the first film that with technology these days, you can do basically whatever you want, so it opens you up as a filmmaker. You can add a character wherever you like, so your imagination is freer and more open. It's been an incredible experience, and it hasn't hurt the actors at all, they love it.
  • Was the experience of working on "Harry Potter" what you expected?
    • I had the best experience of my working life making these two films. The English crew was the best crew I've ever worked with; the actors were completely professional - there's no star nonsense to deal with, even though they are stars. It's been an amazing experience. But I can't do the third for my own family obligations. I've put blood, sweat, tears, everything into these two movies, and I wouldn't be able to give the kids [Daniel, Rupert and Emma] the same amount of energy on the third film, and they deserve that. Having a relationship with these three kids has got to be one of the great things that's happened to me in my life.
  • You've cast Kenneth Branagh as Gilderoy Lockhart in "Chamber of Secrets"...
    • I just think he's one of the greatest living actors, and I think he'll be perfect for the role. That was it, really, it's all based on acting.
  • How did you come up with the look of Dobby?
    • He's described in the books as being a little shrivelled. This is a guy who's had a really difficult life, so we didn't want to portray him as being cute and cuddly. He's basically worn the same clothes all his life and been a servant. You have to fall in love with his inner-character. We had some concerns about doing a CG character, based on some other CG characters in the past who I won't name who were kind of annoying, and we didn't want to be anything like that. What we tried to do was make a character that the audience could love - that was the big challenge - and actually feel for at the end of the film. Part of the credit for that goes to ILM for coming up with a great, realistic-looking character with fantastic skin textures and all of that stuff. The big part of the credit goes to Dan Radcliffe, who was able to focus on a green ball on the end of a stick for all of those sequences. All of our animators said they'd never seen a kid perform like that, with that kind of focus. They said people who are twice his age couldn't focus the way Dan did. So Dan made those scenes work.
  • How do you as a director ensure the film's child stars have a normal childhood?
    • For these kids, I suggest they look at the lives of all the child actors who preceded them in terms of where it didn't work out and they say to themselves, "OK, what didn't work that time, why did these kids have problems as they got older, what went wrong?". Look at that, and then look at the people who were successful - people like Jodie Foster, Ron Howard - who took what they learned from this experience and went on to make not only great lives but great careers for themselves. My advice to these kids is, when you reach a certain point when it's not fun any more, where you feel like you're doing it as a job, or someone older than you is saying you have to do it - walk away, quit, because it's not important. The only thing that matters is your friends and your family. They know it, you can tell these guys have not changed, the key is they have to keep a level head. They all have great parents, and I believe their futures are pretty secure and safe.

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • When will we see the third movie on screen?
    • I don't know if we have a date yet. I know the studio is talking about a date, but the questions is whether we'll make it. I don't know. We're not ready to commit to that yet, we just want to take a little more time with pre-production. And again we've learned a lesson with visual effects - we want the visual effects to be as great as they can be, so we need to take a little more time in post-production.
  • How did it feel being the ex-director? Relief? Or jealousy?
    • Yeah! No, I needed to get out for my own sanity, so I'd be alive for my children at some point. It was with great admiration - one of the great things about being a producer is that you get to step back and watch the work of other directors, and when you are working with someone as visually inspired and talented as Alfonso, it becomes a learning experience for all of us. I admire him as a filmmaker, and I think he's done a wonderful job with the performances in this film - it was just a joyful experience. It was only frustrating to be on the set in that, as a director, you don't want to be on someone else's set. My biggest concern in hiring a director was deciding who would bond with the kids. This was a very special relationship we had over the past four years and I wanted to make absolutely certain that they would be in good hands. When I met Alfonso and I saw how he was interacting with the kids, from the very first moment I knew that they were in great hands.
  • Were there times when you were producing that you wanted to get back into the other man's chair?
    • The only thing that may make me come back for a sixth or seventh film is these kids. They've grown so much as actors since the first film. You can stylistically see the difference, and part of that is based on the performances. Rupert had a tendency to laugh a lot during the first two films, so getting one line on the first film was a little difficult; second film, maybe two or three lines... The first film had a style where you could shoot the kid for one line and then you would have to cut away, and the second film they became better, and they became much more mature. The third film, these guys have a lot of confidence and they have a lot of belief in themselves as actors, so I watch it now kind of as a parent. I'm very impressed with what they've done, so the only time I'd want to leap into the director's chair would be to get a chance to work with them again.
  • Will it be possible to make a two hour film from a thousand page book?
    • I think we've developed a lot of goodwill with the audience with the first two films. We painstakingly, to the regret of some parents, set up Hogwarts in the first film - the bottom line was that the parents thought that the films were long, and the kids wanted more, so it was a delicate balancing act. On the third film, we felt that it was time for us to condense the film slightly, worry about the film, and streamline it. That was something Alfonso always intended, and we felt that it was time to do that. I'm leaving after this film, but David Heyman will be on for the fourth film and the subsequent films that are made, so I would assume that you would have to stick to that philosophy because the books continue to grow.
  • Will there be a different director for each of the next films?
    • We had a fantasy list. Who would you like to see direct a Harry Potter movie? Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppolla, Alfonso - you would love to see one of those films. I don't think Oliver Stone would fit into that world, but I do believe there are certain directors you would want to see, and I'm sure David will carry that along. Mike Newell [directing the fourth film, Goblet Of Fire] was someone... all of us would like to see Mike Newell's vision of a Harry Potter film.
  • You were forced into a crucial piece of recasting following Richard Harris' death.. How important was it for you to get Michael Gambon for the role of Dumbledore?
    • It was an amazing amount of pressure for me, because the last thing that Richard Harris ever said to me was "Don't ever ****ing think about recasting me!" That was in his hospital room as I was saying goodbye to him. Where do you go from there? The idea that someone like Michael Gambon would even consider to do the role was an honour in and of itself. The fact that he has made it his own, and enlivened it of the spirit of what Dumbledore really is in the books, and what Richard set out to do is just a wonderful thing for the series. I think his performance is absolutely wonderful and Richard would be proud.


Christian CoulsonEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • Are you a fan of the "Harry Potter" books?
    • I hadn't read them until I was told that I was going to audition. I had a few days to prepare so I got the first two books and read them. After auditioning I read the next two because I got involved with the whole Harry thing and enjoyed the first two so much.
  • What was the reaction of your friends and family when you got the part?
    • By the time I was given the role I'd been auditioning for about six months, so at that point I think it was a relief for everyone since they'd been watching me slowly go mad waiting to see if I'd got the chance to play it or not. They've been very supportive.
  • What was it like working with Kenneth Branagh?
    • I only met him for the first time at the premiere. The way the movie was filmed - especially the bits I'm in - meant that my scenes were either 50 years in the past or in a space where people don't really go. I didn't really come into contact with many other people on set. While I was shooting, Kenneth Branagh was actually playing Richard III up in Sheffield.
  • Was it strange seeing yourself on-screen?
    • I'd been filming for about a year and a half before this and I still find it difficult - I can't watch stuff I'm in without cringing all the way through. What's nice about "Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets" is that I don't come in for the first 90 minutes, so I get to enjoy all that stuff and then sit through the bits where I appear. But I do find it really difficult. I'm told that I'll get used to it when I get older. It's like when you hear yourself on a tape recorder and you hate the sound of your voice. Only you also hate all the things that you do as well as your voice.
  • Has your life changed since "Harry Potter"?
    • It hasn't really changed anything about my day-to-day life, to be honest. People don't recognise me at all. I walked past a group of people who had just watched the film the other day. They were discussing the scene at the end and they clocked me but they had actually no idea that they were talking about me. Which is kind of nice - I can't imagine what life would be like if you couldn't travel on the Tube and stuff.
  • How scary do you think the spiders were?
    • Quite scary, but I don't mind spiders too much. A couple of friends of mine who have spider phobias came along and they had to sit through those scenes with their hands over their eyes - and they're adults! But most of the children I know who have seen it don't mind the spiders. Adults have a thing about spiders. I think you develop a phobia of spiders when you get older.


Daniel RadcliffeEdit

Philosopher's StoneEdit

  • Harry Potter has been described as the biggest and best hero since James Bond. How does that make you feel?
    • Wow! It makes me feel very privileged to be playing him. It's very exciting because Harry's got such an interesting life.
  • What advice have your parents given you to handle fame?
    • My mum and dad have just told me to enjoy it. There are a lot worse things [that could] happen than just being recognized.
  • What was the most memorable part of film-making, and the most nerve-wracking?
    • I'm not just saying this, but one of the best parts was working with Chris [Columbus], because he's a total inspiration. He really enjoys what he does, and it's a real honour working with him. The most nerve-wracking thing was the first day, because before that it had just been me, Rupert [Grint], Emma [Watson], and Chris, rehearsing in Chris's office. I got the call sheet for the first day, I looked under the cast and it said "Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert Grint". So I thought, Fine, I'm used to that. Then I turned over the page and it said: "Extras, 150." At that moment, I got quite scared.
  • How will you feel if you're still playing Harry when you're 17 or 18?
    • I'm just going to take it one book at a time. Harry advances so much in each [school] year, he comes more out of his shell. If I'm thinking about playing Harry in the fourth book or the third or whatever, I could end up bringing his character from one of them and put it in the second, and it just wouldn't look right.

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • How did you like the action scenes in "Chamber of Secrets"?
    • The action scenes for me were so much fun. In the scene when I'm hanging out of the car window, that was actually me, I was hanging 25-30ft up in the air, and it was just really cool. I do as many of the stunts as possible, although obviously there are some I can't do.
  • Which scenes did you like filming most?
    • I loved filming the duelling scene, I thought that was really brilliant, because you've got the confrontation between Snape and Gilderoy Lockhart - who are totally different characters. I also loved the scenes were there were loads of people around, I love the crowd scenes.
  • What were the most challenging scenes for you?
    • Probably one of the most challenging scenes was the Parseltongue scene, because it was a completely different language [Harry speaks to snakes in their own language] and it was hard to get a hold on at first. I got used to it in the end.
  • What was it like working with Kenneth Branagh?
    • It's intimidating when you're first about to meet him, because he's this unbelievable Shakespearean actor. But then you actually meet him and he's one of the nicest guys I've ever met. It's an honour to work with him.
  • Is it true you've been working out because the owls are so heavy?
    • Kind of. I have been exercising a lot more, but not just for the owls. I've had to do more physical training for the film to do the climbing and the sword-fighting sequences.
  • What was it like working with Dobby?
    • It was kind of hard knowing what kind of facial expression an orange ball is making. There were digital effects on the first film, but none were as animated as Dobby is, so it was quite hard work. But I think most of the credit goes to Chris [Columbus] and everybody who worked on the film, for making it so easy for me.
  • Did you have nightmares after watching the film?
    • I was fine with it, I liked it, I liked the fact it was a darker, more edgy film. If you take away the darkness that's in the book, then you haven't done it justice when you've adapted it.

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • What was it like seeing your faces on the big screen?
    • I've never really liked watching myself that much. I saw the film with some of my friends and I was sitting in the front row of the cinema, and the last frame of the film is one of my face, and it looked like I was about to eat the front row of the audience. It's kind of scary and a bit surreal, but I think we've all gotten used to it now.
  • How different was it working with Alfonso Cuarón compared to Chris Columbus?
    • Everything we learned with Chris over two years - which was a lot - we now get a chance to put it into practice with another director. That was a challenge in itself, because we had to get used to someone else's style, but it has helped us a lot to evolve or develop just making the transition.
  • This time around we see you in jeans, more ordinary clothes. Were you relieved to be out of the school uniforms?
    • Also, more of the story this time takes place in the holidays between terms, so it was quite natural - I don't think that any child anywhere in the world actually wants to wear their school uniform. Apart from Hermione...
  • How do you see your lives beyond the Harry Potter movies?
    • I've got loads of other things that I'm interested in, like music, but I do love acting, and it is something that I want to go on and do. I suppose we'll have to see what happens.
  • Are you enjoying making these films and everything that goes with them as much as you first did. And secondly, if you could influence the way your characters ended up at the end of this adventure, how would you have them end?
    • My favourite part of the whole process, including the interviews, the premieres, whatever, is always the work, actually making the films. People say it's work, but it's not really work, is it? I really enjoy it. It's challenging for me, but it's fun, I really enjoy doing it. I'm going to be really unpopular for saying this about Harry Potter but I always have had this suspicion, that with everything going on in his life, I think he might die. I have a theory - because Harry and Voldemort have got the same core in them: you see that connection between them in the fourth book - I think that the only way that Voldemort can die is if Harry dies as well. I'll probably turn out to be completely and utterly wrong.
  • Alfonso asked you to write an essay about your characters' evolution. What did you write?
    • It was a long time ago - I've completely forgotten. All I remember is that we ended up being freakishly like our characters. Emma hates me to bring this up, but I wrote one page of A4 about Harry, and Emma, well, Emma wrote about 20 pages.
    • Emma Watson: No! It gets more and more every time. It was ten, then 12, then 16, now 20? Come on! I have big handwriting, and I leave big spaces, OK?
  • David Heyman [the producer] has said that you might end up too old for the parts one day. Would you mind, or would you want to get on with your lives and do other films?
    • Whatever happens happens. I love doing the films, but I am interested in going on to do other films at some point. When that will be, I don't know.. Each one takes about a year to film, then about six months after that until it comes out, so there's a while until I have to think about doing a fifth one yet. I'm not going to lie and say it'd be completely easy, and that I'd be happy someone else playing the part - it would be extremely strange having played it for what would be four films. If it happened it would be something I'd have to get used to. Also, people do play people younger than they are in real life. I'm going to be 15 in a couple of months, and Harry is 14 now, so I don't think it would make that much difference, really.
  • Were you intimidated with working with such an amazing cast?
    • Well, I hope Gary [Oldman] doesn't mind me saying this, but since I started acting I have always been a really huge fan of his. I've watched loads of his films and think that he is just the most fantastic, fantastic actor, so for me to be working with him is absolutely a huge honour and a privilege. To be working with Gary, David Thewlis, Timothy Spall and Alan Rickman in the same room was quite intimidating - not because they were intimidating us, just because they are such fantastic actors. Seeing them together was just fantastic to watch.
  • Are you happy to be associated with Harry Potter for the rest of your career?
    • That's a cheerful thought... The stupidest thing I could possibly do would be to be angry at being thought of as Harry Potter, because it has given me so many amazing opportunities. Hopefully I'll be able to go onto other things, play different characters, and hopefully people will like it. Ideally, the first thing I do after Harry Potter will be different from the character of Harry, but the ideal part for every actor is different from the last part he did, so we'll see what happens.
  • How has doing the Potter movies over the last four years influenced the way you've grown up?
    • I think we're maturing the same way that any other teenager goes from 13 to 14. I don't think there's that much difference. Obviously we are on a film set a lot of the time, but I don't think we've lost anything from that. I'm having a great time, and I don't think that it is going to hurt me in the long run or anything.

Goblet of FireEdit

  • How do you feel about growing up with your character?
    • In a way growing up with Harry makes it easier to act in each of the films because I've been through all the stuff that he's going through, like the hormones relatively recently. It's quite fresh in my mind and it doesn't stop after you've turned 14. Then I suppose it's been made easier by the fact I've been doing it since I was 11. You get to know the character so well that it makes it easier to act in the long run.
  • How much do you think you have matured along with your character and did you make many suggestions to Mike Newell [the director] in terms of your own acting?
    • I think we've grown up in the normal way. I think there's nothing peculiar in the way we've matured. In terms of suggestions to Mike, we spoke up. We are older now so it is good for us to feel like we're not just child actors any more. We've grown up and are now able to make our own acting decisions, obviously in collaboration with Mike.
  • What was your most embarrassing moment while filming Harry Potter?
    • My most embarrassing moment would have to have been the dancing. I mean, I really enjoyed it, I had a really good time, because the girl was just incredibly cool. But I'd like to point out that most other people had a lot more rehearsal at the dancing than me, and you'll notice Mike very kindly didn't show anything below my waist. It's dancing from the waist up, so you never see my feet move, which is quite a good thing.
  • Are you reconciled to the fact that the books are coming to an end? What will you do post Potter?
    • Well, "reconciled" makes it sound like we're not looking forward to it. I think we're all really excited about it. We've got a while before the films end and we're not all absolutely confirmed as doing them all. We're all definitely doing the fifth but after that who knows? I'm also doing a new film that's set in Australia. It's centred around four young Australian boys who have grown up in a Catholic orphanage in the Outback. The orphanage comes into some money via a donor and they send the boys for their birthdays to the sea for a couple of weeks, and it's just about the time they spend there. It's five and a half weeks and no blue screen, and so it's wonderful! And so I think we're all looking forward to going on to other things.
  • After wearing the same glasses for four years, will Harry discover contacts?
    • I tried contacts in the first film because in the book Harry's eyes are supposed to be a brilliant green and mine are much bluer than they should be. So we put green contact lenses in but they were excruciatingly painful. So I don't think we'll be going back down the contact road if I can avoid it. But one thing that I think Harry Potter has actually done - because I used to wear glasses a lot - is to make them kind of cool. JK Rowling has stuck up for any person who has ever been called four eyes or ever been teased about it.


David BradleyEdit

Half-Blood PrinceEdit

  • How is it working with Daniel, Emma and Rupert?
    • You wouldn’t even know that they had made the money they have. Their parents and the people looking after them keep them grounded. They don’t disappear off to their trailers in between bits, they hang around and chat like the rest of us. Those kids work really hard. I really admire them.

Deathly HallowsEdit

  • Now it's the last Harry Potter film due to be out next year. How do you feel about that?
    • I’ll miss everybody. It’s been a great ride and great to be part of something that’s gone on for 10 years and I’ve managed to go that whole time without getting killed off! We’ll have a big bash at the end as we always do.


David HeymanEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • How much can you assume of an audience? Not everyone's read the "Harry Potter" books...
    • I think the books stand on their own terms. In the second film, we dive straight into the story. If you'd seen the first film, or read the first or second book, you may have had certain nuances that you may get that those who haven't don't, but I think the film works in its own right.
  • Do you think the children can play their characters in all seven movies?
    • The only decision that has been made has been in regard to the third film, which all three [Daniel, Rupert, Emma] are going to be in. We haven't really thought about the fourth. We're in the process of hiring a screenwriter, and that's as far as we've gotten.

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • Why did you choose Alfonso Cuarón to direct "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban"?
    • Although Alfonso has never made a film on the scale of "Harry Potter", when you look at his work a lot of it does recommend itself for Harry. "Y Tu Mamá También" - no, there's not going to be a lot of sex in "Harry Potter", don't worry about that - it's very much about being a teenager. And Alfonso has a really keen understanding of the nuances of being a teenager. "Y Tu Mamá " is about the tail-end of being a teenager, and "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" is about the beginning of being a teenager. He has great compassion, and if you look at "A Little Princess", you also see a director of boundless imagination and a real sense of magic, which are also very important. He also has a great sense of humour, and I think he'll be great.

Order of the PhoenixEdit

  • David, what can you tell us about The Order of the Phoenix, about the cast and when is it going to shoot?
    • It starts filming in February. We asked Mike [Newell] if he would do it and he said no. These films are real endurance tests and I don't know how Chris Columbus managed to do two back to back. At the end of each film we ask the director if they want to do the next one. We asked Alfonso to do the fourth and he said no and Mike said no to the fifth. We've hired someone called David Yates who is a brilliant director. He directed State of Play, Girl in the Café and Sex Traffic. I think we've been really lucky. Each director has been just right for the film they've done and I think David Yates is the right director for the fifth film.


Emma WatsonEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • What was it like working with Kenneth Branagh?
    • When I first met him I thought he'd be really intimidating, but he's such an amazing person. He's really, really down to earth and is a really nice guy. I think he portrayed the character of Gilderoy Lockhart perfectly - really cheesy and really funny.
  • If you had a house elf, what things would you like him to do?
    • I wasn't in any scenes with Dobby, but I thought he was really sweet and I'd like to take him home and sit him on the bed with the rest of my cuddly toys.
  • Did you have nightmares after watching the film?
    • No, not at all. I think that's what makes it really good. Even though there a darker bits and the plot's a bit more complicated, there are still some light scenes - I was laughing all the way through.

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • This time around we see you in jeans, more ordinary clothes. Were you relieved to be out of the school uniforms?
    • I think it made things more normal, more comfortable. It made it easier to do the stunts as well, and it lets you see a different side to all of the characters. Plus, we're teenagers now, and I think that that has more of an influence on it. It feels more personal when you are in your own clothes.
  • How do you see your lives beyond the Harry Potter movies?
    • I love performing; I love acting; I love singing; I love dancing. There are so many different aspects of the film world that hopefully I will end up in some area of it. Maybe on the stage, I don't know. Whatever gets thrown at me, really.
  • What's it like being the cleverest witch, and do you think that girls are cleverer than boys in real life anyway?
    • Oh, definitely! I love playing Hermione, she is so charismatic. She's a fantastic role to play, especially in this third one. It's my favourite book, my favourite script. She's taken two films of people being rude to her, being nasty to her, and either pretending that she didn't hear or just saying "forget about it". But in this one it's a real turning point for her because she says "That's it, I'm not taking this any more!" She punches Malfoy, she storms out on teachers. She's rock and roll, she's girl power, she's feisty in this one.
  • Are you enjoying making these films and everything that goes with them as much as you first did. And secondly, if you could influence the way your characters ended up at the end of this adventure, how would you have them end?
    • I feel quite close to Hermione - I feel very protective of her when I read the books, so I hope she ends up doing something that she loves, I hope she ends up being happy.
  • With Ron?
    • Maybe!? Maybe... if that makes her happy...
  • David Heyman [the producer] has said that you might end up too old for the parts one day. Would you mind, or would you want to get on with your lives and do other films?
    • We only started the fourth one two weeks ago. Every film takes a year to do, and these are big projects, and I think it's hard for all three of us to look anywhere beyond that. I'm not sure yet.
  • Were you intimidated with working with such an amazing cast?
    • The last scene, which had Alan Rickman, Timothy Spall, Gary Oldman and David Thewlis all in the same room, was a bit overwhelming, but it was great because it really challenged me. Even if it wasn't personal advice, just watching them work was a huge help in terms of helping us mature as actors. I was so pleased to be working with Emma Thompson. She's done a great job with Trelawney - she's absolutely hilarious.
  • Emma, have you lost your youth?
    • I haven't lost my youth! I've known Rupert and Dan since the beginning of this, and I think that they are exactly the same as when we started. I hope that I am too.

Goblet of FireEdit

  • How do you feel about growing up with your character?
    • It feels like I don't really have to act any more. There's so much of me in Hermione and her in me that it feels like I'm barely doing anything sometimes.
  • How much do you think you have matured along with your character and did you make many suggestions to Mike Newell [the director] in terms of your own acting?
    • I think one of the great things about Mike was that he really treated us like adults and he gave us the responsibility. I remember sometimes I would say: "Just tell me how to do it! Please just tell me, I can't do it. I can't get this right." And he was like: "I can't tell you and I'm not going to tell you how to do it. It's got to come from you." He guided and directed us. I think I've definitely, definitely learned a lot from Mike.
  • This has been given a 12A rating; it's much darker and scarier than the other films. Are you worried that your younger fans won't get to see it?
    • I think to some extent our audience were first fans of the Harry Potter books and so are growing up with the films. So it should work out OK. To some extent we might have lost some of the much younger audience. I'm in it and I was scared! But at the same time I think that we will have gained from it. I think this one is much more of a thriller than it ever has been before. You can't avoid the fact that someone dies in it at the end of the day. There are some very serious and deep topics in it. You just can't avoid it. I love the fact that they haven't pulled the punches, I love the fact that they have gone with it and that they've made something which is true to the book.
  • Are you reconciled to the fact that the books are coming to an end? What will you do post Potter?
    • One of the things that got me so into acting and one of the things I loved about acting was being on a stage with a live audience. So I think maybe something in the theatre. But I've had so many scripts for films through, which is fantastic, and I'm reading away and hoping to find something I really fall in love with. I think I'd like to do something quite different from this, maybe something a bit smaller. But we'll see!


Gary OldmanEdit

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • Were you influenced by any cinematic bad guys when you were a kid, and what were your children's reactions when they found out you were going to be in a Harry Potter movie?
    • I can't say I'm influenced by other bad guys - maybe Bela Lugosi - but I didn't really have a role model for this one. But when it was announced that I was doing this movie, I was a superstar overnight at my kids' school. Now they've got the posters and the t-shirts and the 'articulated action figure' of Sirius Black, so they actually take me to school on their share day. They're loving the whole experience. One of them is still a little young - Charlie, he's five - but my big boy Alfie, he's 15, and he was at the premiere. They're thrilled that I'm part of this family and this phenomenon that is Harry Potter.
  • How was it coming into this established family, and into an established role?
    • I arrived from a different planet, and I was intimidated. I knew that Dan [Radcliffe, Harry Potter] was a fan, and so you have the added responsibility of hoping that you live up to that expectation - I didn't want to disappoint him. I just wanted to do the best Sirius Black I could do. You are made to feel at home very quickly, but at first you are very much an outsider coming into this family.


Imelda StauntonEdit

Deathly HallowsEdit

  • You are also going to reprise your role as professor Umbridge...?
    • Now, that is a great role. It was wonderful playing this baddie dressed in pink, and to be able to play her again is a real treat.
  • Your first Harry Potter was in 2007. Did it change your life?
    • No, not really. I don't get chased down the street by hordes of kids. I still live a very normal life. The one good thing is that I get a lot more good scripts coming through my letterbox. Vera Drake raised my profile in one way, and then Harry Potter in another.


Jamie Campbell BowerEdit

Half-Blood PrinceEdit

  • Are you happy that you snuck in under the wire to be a part of the Harry Potter series at its end?==
    • Yeah, I’m incredibly happy. I went up for a role a few years ago. Didn’t get it. David Yates called me up…well, I shouldn’t say, “called me up.” His assistant called my agent, who then called me. [Laughs] And they offered it to me and I was more than happy to do it.
  • Which role had you gone up for before?
    • I went up for the young Voldemort. Was that the second film or the sixth? Oh, I don’t know. It was a few years ago.


Jason IsaacsEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • Your character, Lucius Malfoy, appears for the first time in "Chamber of Secrets". Was it difficult coming into an established group?
    • No, it was like turning up to a very good party where all of the people are just slightly bored of each other and are thrilled when the doorbell rings. They were terribly welcoming.

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • Your character doesn't appear in "Prisoner of Azkaban". What would you ask JK Rowling to do to increase your role in future books?
    • I probably shouldn't mention this in public, but she has actually sent me an early draft of the next book, which is called "Harry Potter and the Chronicles of Lucius", which is all about Lucius' early romantic adventures. She's warned me it might change before publication, so I'll wait and see... I'm just hoping still to be around in the next film, there's concern that I might be too old when we get to the fourth and fifth, but I think with moisturiser and CGI they might be able to work some magic. I hope to get to poke my face in. I'm deeply bitter that I don't get to work with Alfonso and see this merry bunch on the third one, I hope that I'm back for the fourth. The only clue I have is that I keep reading these interviews with Jo Rowling where she says it's been very painful writing Book Five ["Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix"] because she's had to kill off characters she loves. Reading between the lines, nobody loves Lucius, so I assume I'm still alive!


Jessie CaveEdit

Half-Blood PrinceEdit

  • For your final audition, what scene did you get to act out with Rupert?
    • We actually had to improvise for a good 15 or 20 minutes, which is very scary. It’s a really long time. The director, David Yates, was there and he was just like, “Hi. Right. Here’s a plate of biscuits, Jessie. It’s a lovely plate of chocolate biscuits and I want you to do whatever you want with these biscuits.’ Rupert was in the room, sitting on the sofa, and I just thought, ‘What the hell am I going to do with this plate of biscuits?’
  • What did you end up doing?
    • I thought, ‘I’m just going to go for it.’ And I think Rupert was a bit scared, really. The biscuits were past the sofa, away from me so I kind of just tangled myself around Rupert and just made it really obvious that I didn’t really care about the biscuits. I just wanted to be near him. I think he was quite scared.
  • Awww, he was probably acting, too. Right?
    • No, he was actually scared [laughs]. I think he’s easily scared though, bless him. He was so lovely and we really got on and made each other laugh, and that helped.
  • Was he less scared once you started filming?
    • He was very easygoing and very laid-back. He didn’t at all have any kind of ego, he was just a nice guy and very normal. It was easy to become friends with him, which I didn’t expect to be honest. I’ve watched [the ‘Harry Potter’ stars] since I was young and, you know, I didn’t think they’d be as normal as they are. It’s quite weird.
  • Do you remember what your first day on set was like?
    • It’s funny, I was filming for six months, but I remember my third day was the big kissing scene. I remember thinking, ‘Why are they doing this so early?’ It helped actually because the nerves kind of added to the scene. There were so many extras, like 70 other people in the room, it could have gone so wrong. The first day was kind of building up to the kissing scene, so it was immediately going into the deep end.
  • If I remember correctly, Lavender’s the aggressor in the relationship, right?
    • Ha! Yes, she is incredibly dominating of Ron. She just wants to be around him all the time and she’s the one who initiates everything. She’s one of those girls that’s very pretty and very obvious, she’s just not really aware of how she’s being perceived by anyone else. And I think that’s really sweet in a way because she doesn’t perceive barriers very well [laughs]. She treads all over them. It’s why she ruffles Hermione’s feathers so much.
  • She does put up a good fight.
    • She’s almost the catalyst in setting up Hermione and Ron in the final chapter of the saga really. Without Lavender, they wouldn’t have been forced together, to acknowledge their feelings so abruptly because she definitely caused that.
  • How did it feel playing someone who everyone will know doesn’t stand a chance?
    • Well, she does really! She does quite well. She does go out with him and does get her claws into him for awhile. Not claws -- she’s lovely. She does get her way for a tiny bit, but unfortunately, it doesn’t end up her way.
  • How is Lavender introduced?
    • She’s in the Weasleys’ Wizard Wheezes shop and she’s kind of ogling Ron. She’s been going to school with them for years, but it’s not that she’s making her interests known.
  • Were you already a 'Harry Potter' fan when you auditioned for the part?
    • Oh, yes! I’m one of five in my family and we’ve all gone through the books at different paces. I read ‘Half-Blood Prince’ before I knew anything about the auditions. So to have already read the character was so great. Also, my little brothers and sisters are so excited, and proud. It’s impacted their lives in a really nice way. So I’m really grateful for it.
  • Did any of them get to go with you to the set?
    • I brought them all on set but my little sister, she’s 11, she was the one who was in awe of everything. Jim Broadbent was there, and Daniel Radcliffe. I brought her into the Potions classroom and I signaled Daniel to wave at her without her seeing. And then Daniel waved and she thought he had done that for no reason and she was in seventh heaven. She was absolutely star-struck. She almost fainted when she saw Emma [Watson] in the corridor. It is so bizarre to actually meet them because, you know, they’re on posters everywhere. It’s so weird. My sister’s got sticker books of them and then to actually meet them? There’s actually a new sticker book with me in it, so she’s got stickers of me now. It’s so sweet. I can’t believe I’m actually a sticker.
  • What’s been the best perk that comes with being in a 'Harry Potter' movie?
    • Just to be there every day was so brilliant. I’m so happy with it. I had a few scenes with Michael Gambon, and in the hospital scene, I met all of British acting royalty. I was so scared I didn’t really speak. To be in the room with them is quite overwhelming. Someone behind me said, ‘You’re standing next to three Oscars and a BAFTA,‘ or something. Yeah, that made it much easier for me [laughs]. That was the best thing.


John CleeseEdit

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • Since we've talked about you being recognized for Python, have you had any kids recognize you as Nearly Headless Nick yet?
    • No. Because...
  • Because your head is still on [laughs]?
    • Yeah! And with the make-up and all that... I seldom get recognized. Most of the kids now, the young kids, recognize me for RAT RACE which became very popular on video. So, I would say the young kids tend to recognize me from that. Almost entirely from that, really. They kind of get very interested when they hear that I'm in Harry Potter, but they can't remember which one I was.
  • What do you think of the whole Harry Potter craze? Are you into it or are just kinda confounded by it?
    • Um... Like most people... Just anything that makes kids read. Anything we can do to reclaim them back from this vacuous world of modern day television.
  • Have you filmed your part in "Azkaban" yet?
    • In what?
  • In "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban".
    • Oh, I'm not in it.
  • You're not in it?!?
    • No... or at least I don't think I am. The producer tried to get a hold of me at some stage, but I think he got embarrassed. I heard that I wasn't in the third one, but that I was going to be back in again for the fourth. I haven't spoken to anyone involved in the Harry Potter movies about it.
  • Well, I'm glad you're still in "Goblet of Fire"...
    • Well, I haven't heard from them for ages, but I was told I was going to be in the fourth one.


John HurtEdit

Deathly HallowsEdit

  • You’re returning to Harry Potter for the final films having appeared in the very first one, how has it been to come back?
    • I’ve filmed one, which actually is the last one, and now I’ve got the penultimate one to do which is in November, and that wraps it all up. It’s a big loss for Britain in terms of having a big studio movie here, but it’s not representative of our culture in terms of the films that we make. I am convinced that though Pinewood and Shepperton — the big studios — playing host to big movies is very important, our film business is in the independent world. Of that I’m convinced. I only wish that our government would take a bit more notice, because that’s where we need the help. We need the help because we need to get it going on a basis that has a bit more continuity for everyone concerned, from technicians to directors to performers and so on. And, indeed, to audiences, because you can’t have an audience engage with culture if it’s not educated in it. It’s important that we educate people.


Katie LeungEdit

Order of the PhoenixEdit

  • How does it feel second time around being in Harry Potter?
    • I feel more relaxed in this one and comfortable. It almost feels like a second home where I get to see my friends again. I'm also more confident in front of the camera this time.
  • There's a lot more for your character to do in this one, including the big kiss with Harry Potter. How was it?
    • It's kind of strange seeing pictures of yourself in papers kissing Harry Potter. You can't really avoid it, though. My friends are always asking me about it. Before I did the scene everyone kept coming up to me and asking if I was looking forward to it. It got me really, really nervous and I was having sleepless nights over it. But when I actually did the scene it went very well and Dan was great. He said he was nervous as well. But the director [David Yates] was really cool about it too.
  • How was new director David Yates compared to Mike Newell?
    • He was great - not that Mike Newell wasn't! But David is just so gentle. His voice is just really soft. Whenever he speaks to me I kind of go weak at the knees. He's really amazing to work with. For example, during some of the emotional scenes he would say: "Cho's really upset and she's on her own." It was just so heartbreaking the way he said it that he really put me into the mood of the character.
  • Was there any difference in the atmosphere on this one, because there's a very serious death?
    • I think it's generally a lot darker. We always say this whenever the next film comes out but it is darker than the rest. We are all growing up now. When I was portraying my character, she was always upset and depressed and that's a big change from when I was filming the fourth one. Then, she was just a normal happy-go-lucky teenager, who had a crush on Harry. So, in this one I tried to prepare for it beforehand.
  • How difficult was it to prepare for some of the more emotional scenes - and did you have any trouble switching off at the end of the day?
    • It's much easier to switch off than on. You can be with friends having a laugh on set and then suddenly have to switch on emotionally. I tried to barricade myself in the dressing room for a few hours before we shot scenes and listen to Coldplay, or watch a tear-jerker movie. I watched Crash. It's a really good film but it did make me cry. The only trouble is that when you get back on set and people are trying to do your hair and make-up, you're surrounded by your friends again!
  • Have you had any feedback from fans or JK Rowling?
    • Oh God, I haven't met her yet. I'm hoping to meet her at the premiere. But the fans have been amazing. I get fan mail and they're really supportive. They tell me how great I was and how much they love the movies. It's very encouraging.
  • How has the Harry Potter experience changed your life? Do you get recognised now?
    • It hasn't really changed my life in a great way. I'm more confident in general. I used to be really, really shy, which is never a good thing because you never speak up for yourself. Now I don't stop talking! But in terms of being recognised, it doesn't really happen that often. I get the odd person coming up and saying they love the films.
  • Your first two films have been Harry Potter films. Has that spoiled you? Or are you looking forward to working on something with a lower budget?
    • I have really started at the top so it's kind of hard to say I'll go on to do bigger and better things! I would love to do a lower budget movie, where there's a lot of drama and intensity and a challenging character. But we'll have to wait and see. I'd love to continue with acting, although I'm not entirely sure what I want to do yet. I think I'll probably end up making my mind up at the last minute, like I always do. But I'd like to go university as well and study graphic design, perhaps. I've just moved to London, so I'm settling in.


Mark WilliamsEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • Is there anything that Arthur Weasley has done in the books that you wish he had done in the film?
    • Yes! Well, I talked about this with Christopher Columbus and he was very clear that this was not gonna happen. But when we first see Arthur Weasley, he arrives home and a load of gnomes is eating in his garden and he kind of zaps them ... I so wish I could've done that.

Half-Blood PrinceEdit

  • For Harry Potter, did you read any of the novels before you were cast?
    • Yeah! I read them before I was cast and was, kind of embarrassingly, a fan, a bit. I found my agent and said 'Is anybody gonna read these as talking books because I'd like to put my name up for it.' I knew who Arthur Weasley was, and I know who I am and I knew I could do it. I've been in "101 Dalmatians" and "The Borrowers" and "Shakespeare in Love" and stuff ... and I felt like I had a connection.
  • Arthur Weasley's role has increased through the series -- how did you approach him having a more active role?
    • I didn't know, but I believe that she has said that he's the only functional father left. Actually, though, I think he's the only functional father. Lucius isn't a functional father. "Proto" fathers Sirius and Dumbledore are dead, and there's no nice way to put that, so he's the only good image of a father really. But you should ask her about that, and believe me when we finish I will ask her.
  • So, the movies still have the whimsy, but they're getting a little darker it seems. How have you and your character dealt with that?
    • Well, it was always dark ... John Williams picked it up perfectly, I mean with music being 30% of the film .. I mean, you know, [Potter's] parents were killed. There's just these great Dickensian [themes]. I've never said that before and I kind of wished I hadn't -- but these great big scenes that you can play on the cello, you know what I mean. As time's gone on, I've just been more and more impressed about [Rowling's] sense of geography and knowing where she's going. There's a big map in there and I've never felt that any of the concerns or themes or problems have been swept under the carpet. What's nice is that going into the last two films, thinking that this is a great pleasure to play this character .. and it's great that when we finish, we're gonna be finished. Not gonna be left hanging.
  • But Arthur Weasley's pretty good with his wand, right?
    • You know, I don't get to fight much. I mean, I guess I will in the next two. My wand is rather nice, though. It's a barley sugar handle. It's kind of twisted, it's very refined. Mad-Eye Moody's wand is very lumpy, but mine has a kind of regency feel to it. It's a bit shaky, though.
  • Do you get to keep it off set?
    • You're joking! Man, you don't even get to ... you know, if you read the script in the wrong place, the Harry Potter police come and get you.
  • If you could, once all of the films are done, take something from the set, what would it be?
    • In the Weasley household, there is a clock that shows where everybody is. It's the most beautiful piece of prop-making. Lots of that is unappreciated and you just go on the set and you're like 'Oh my God!' You just want to give it a close-up ... The hands are the ends of scissors, and it says things like 'school,' 'work' ... and one of the sections says 'in mortal peril.' I'd love that. And it doesn't work, by the way, cause I've been in mortal peril and it didn't say anything. I've come back and it just said 'at work.'

Deathly HallowsEdit

  • So, how much freedom did you get to shape Arthur Weasley to your liking?
    • Well, in the book he's kind of balding and said to Chris [Columbus] 'Well, do you want me to shave my head or something' and he said 'No! No, don't do that!' He looked at me and said 'Don't take it so literally.' J.K. Rowling has been very good about that. She's allowed the films to develop sort of in parallel to the books, but she hasn't changed the sort of characterization of the books either ... And with "Deathly Hallows," I think for the first time, as the books got bigger, Steve Kloves' job got harder and harder. But having two parts to the last book is good. I'm a big champion of it, and not just because I'm in them. She [J.K. Rowling] has such a mathematical brain, or better put, a musical brain and all the themes and the melodies were resolved in the last book.


Matthew LewisEdit

Half-Blood PrinceEdit

  • Most of the people involved in the movie -- actors, producers, crew, etc. -- were fans of the book before coming aboard. Same with you?
    • Yeah, absolutely! I think I'd read the first four and gotten to "Goblet of Fire" before I had my first audition. I went ahead and asked my mom if I could be a part of the film in any way, so I asked if I could go for an audition. When I heard that I was going to be Neville it was just fantastic.
  • Were you going out specifically for the role of Neville?
    • No, not at all. I literally said 'I just want to be a part of this in any way.' So I just went to the audition without any character in mind ... I just wanted to do anything.
  • There's a story floating around about you putting on a cape and running around the room, etc. ... is this true?
    • [Laughs] I only did this once! When I was about 9, 10, I guess ... I had my dressing gown on and, uh, I was just running around the house pretending to be Harry Potter for a bit.
  • Well, I think Neville is a really cool character too. How did you approach him when you found out that's who you'd be? I know you were pretty young.
    • Well, yeah. I would have these chats with Christopher Columbus and we sort of talked about what really we thought Neville was all about and where he was coming from in terms of his family and his relationship with his grandmother and all that kind of thing. I went back and read the previous books, but there wasn't really a whole lot known about Neville back then in terms of his background or his parents, and really even his character. And so when "Order of the Phoenix" came out and we found out about his background, it added a Machiavellian quality to Neville that needed to be brought in, so that was something that I really focused on.
  • As an actor, how happy did it make you to read that?
    • It was incredible! Neville was never really explored ... but then from "Order of the Phoenix" onward, this whole new side of Neville came through and you realize why he was like he was and find out where he got his heart from and his courage. For me, it was just so wonderful because I was such a fan of the character. Then, as an actor, it became a great challenge to bring all of those emotions to the role.
  • How's the relationship between all of you actors who have grown up together on the set?
    • Well, people ask me that question all the time. And you'd expect me to say 'Oh yeah, everyone gets on great' -- but no one really believes me. You know, if you stick a lot of people together at such a young age and for such a long time, you automatically expect there to be arguments -- you expect there to be fallouts and for people to not get on. But somehow, remarkably, we all just get on so well. It's been a fantastic nine years really, and I'm looking forward to the next couple. We spend time with each other off the set. We like the same sorts of music, we all have the same sort of sense of humor and comedy likes ... we just get on so great. I think it really shows on camera. You know when James and Oliver Phelps, who play the Weasley twins, and Rupert, who plays Ron, when they're in scenes, a lot of the banter that they have as brothers is ad-libbed, and they can do that kind of stuff because they just get along so well.
  • I'm sure everyone by now really feels they know their characters, so how much freedom do you guys really get to ad-lib?
    • We do get a lot ... we really do ... and David Yates is fantastic and the perfect type of director for that sort of thing. He'll sort of chat with us and say 'Well, here's my idea for this character in this particular scene, but you've been playing this guy for nine years, so what do you think?' Then he'll let me say my bit and we'll talk it out and make an agreement on something and usually it turns out to be perfect. Honestly, we can spin our ideas forward and David'll always listen, even if he thinks something else. Yeah, he's a great director for that.
  • Was there anything where you thought 'Hey, Neville would do this,' but it was an action that may NOT have been written in the books?
    • Umm, well, I try to not stray too much from the character in the book. Neville's walk, really, is something I spent a lot of time trying to perfect. She never really mentioned it in the book. It's interesting though, because he is a shy, vulnerable person that becomes quite courageous and rebellious. In the previous films, he was always the sort of person I imagined with his shoulders low and sort of shuffling his feet along trying to keep out of people's way. It was never really mentioned in the book, but was something I felt was quite important for Neville. I felt like for someone so physical as Neville, it was an important element that needed to be brought in -- even if Neville was sort of walking in the background, you could identify and people could sort of feel sorry for him.
  • So you're walking around your hometown and you've been in your role for a while now, have you adjusted to it? And how did you adjust?
    • You know, it's strange really. When I'm in my hometown, a lot of people know who I am and the work I do. And because they know me, they really don't care that much. Not many people will ever walk up to me, though I do get recognized every once in a while ... I love it when fans come up and talk to me, though. I love it when they tell me what they think. A lot of it is probably also because I wear a fat suit in the films, and I look different when I take it off at the end of the day -- and I always cut my hair after filming. People may recognize me and say, 'Well no, it can't be him.' That sort of stuff happens more in London instead of where I live in Leeds. They don't really care. They just let me get on with it at home ... The most I ever get recognized is when I'm abroad.
  • Have there been any hugely strange encounters yet?
    • Usually fans are OK. On the whole, they're pretty cool people. There was this lady -- and again, she was lovely -- instead of coming over to me, she went to my parents. She singled my mom out and she sort of grabbed my mom's hand and she looked her in the eye and said 'Thank you for giving birth to him.' My mom was so confused! She was like 'What?!' That was pretty strange.
  • You're filming or about to film 'Deathly Hallows,' and Stuart Craig said the films have always been dark, but how do you feel about the films' increasing darkness?
    • There has been an element of darkness all the way through. You have this evil element in Voldemort, a sort of ultimate evil all the way through. But the previous films have always had a sort of happy ending and they all develop friendship and love, and it started to get -- towards 5 and now 6 -- where the happy endings were not so easy. And especially here in the "Half-Blood Prince," it's not a 'nice' story. It's very dramatic, very dark, and it's really got this sense of foreboding throughout the film that just keeps getting worse because Voldemort's getting away with it every year. Harry's not saving the day anymore. In that respect, it's definitely getting darker. I will say one thing about "Half-Blood Prince," though. Though it is much more sinister, there's a lovely balance this year with the comedy as well that makes it more relatable.
  • That's interesting. There've been funny parts, but comedy doesn't always come to mind when you think of "Harry Potter."
    • Absolutely, I totally agree. It's not the first thing you'd think to associate, but this year, it's almost a romantic comedy actually. There's a lot of ... well, the hormones are raging this year with all of the 16- and 17-year-olds .. it makes for some very very uncomfortable moments. And Jim Broadbent comes in, and he's in top form. His comedy timing is superb.
  • You mentioned hormones and such. Has there been anything hormonal going on on-set between all of you young people?
    • [Laughs] Well, it's sort of strange because we all live in different parts, dotted around England. So when we're at the studio -- well excluding Dan, Rupe and Emma who are always there -- we're not there the whole time. We're sort of there for about six months during the year with six months off. It's like we all lead these double lives. People tend to have their relationships, boyfriends and girlfriends, back home and nothing really sort of happens at the studio. I can't speak for the crew! But for the cast, not much goes on. I mean, like Emma Watson is everyone's little sister.
  • Back to acting then ... Was there anything you didn't get to do as Neville?
    • There was some stuff that we got to do that was cut out, which is always a shame. Remember in the "Order of the Phoenix," the big battle at the end in the Ministry of Magic? We shot a lot that wasn't included in the film. The room with the brains in it I was kind of looking forward to seeing ... The one scene in particular that I really wanted to do as an actor was the St. Mungo's Hospital scene where we see Neville's parents for the first time. It was just something that I thought was really important to the character cause it showed a really soft side to him. His parents were there and they didn't recognize him and there was that lovely bit where they give him the sweet ... I remember when I was reading it in the book and it was tear-jerking and really, really endearing. I just thought in that one scene it really showed what Neville was all about. How he's got all this heart, and even though the doctors are saying that they don't know who you are, he still believes in them. And I thought 'That's Neville.' That heart, that courage, that belief showed what Neville Longbottom was all about. And as an actor, it's a shame that we didn't get to do that. I've never really had to do anything on that level emotionally, so that would've been a great challenge.


Michael GambonEdit

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • How was it coming into this established family, and into an established role?
    • Well I knew most of the other actors anyway - I've known Maggie Smith for around 40 years, so I was quite relaxed with them. The first week was a bit tense, but then I settled down and did my own thing. What put me off was having to do a 25 word description of my character for Alfonso... I said "Did you ask Richard Harris to do that?" and he said "No."
  • You've added something of yourself to the role. How hard is it to strike the balance without compromising the character of Dumbledore?
    • It all happened with the costume, really. Richard was in heavy, heavy costume, he could hardly sit, you know, and I turned up and they put me in two layers of silk, so I played him much lighter - you know, floating around in a pair of slippers, a bit of a hippy. I had a slight Irish accent - because, you know, I am Irish - it sort of just happened. Alfonso asked "What accent are you using?" and I said "I'm not sure yet". So the Irish came out. He said, "What is that?" I said Irish, and he said he'd never heard it before.

Half-Blood PrinceEdit

  • I haven’t gotten to see the movie yet, but I’m very familiar with the books. It’s one of my favorite books of the series, actually, and I think a lot of the reason I like the book so much is that it’s really Dumbledore-centric.
    • Yeah, it is. It’s Dumbledore’s final wind-up, isn’t it? He’s not well. He’s losing his stature, he’s getting sick, he’s being infected by all these horcruxes and Harry sort of takes over, becomes his father in a way. He holds him up.
  • I also like, in the book at least, we get to see Dumbledore’s process. In previous stories he disappears and what he does is mysterious.
    • That’s right. You see more of a depth to Dumbledore, more of his thought patterns. I like the bit where I get dressed up as the young Dumbledore. I really loved that. I wear a suit and a hat. Apparently I looked reasonably young.
  • Were you looking forward to approaching this film more than the others because of…
    • Well, I get more to do in it, so I liked it from that point of view. The first few months we were shooting was just me and Dan (Radcliffe) doing all those interior scenes together; the cave scenes, the lake scenes. So, we were stuck there for months just the two of us at this great, big film studio.
  • That must have been a great change of pace for a series that is usually juggling so many characters.
    • That’s right. That’s right, yeah. I finished a year ago, so it’s a long time ago. I’ve forgotten a lot what happens in it, but I liked it very much.
  • I would say the biggest emotional kick in the entire series rests on your shoulders in this film.
    • When I die.
  • Yeah, but not just that. The lead up to it as well, with Malfoy.
    • That’s right, that’s right. But you haven’t seen that bit yet, right?
  • No, I’ve only read it.
    • It’s a good section, that.
  • How did you approach that scene in particular… not just the death scene, but the entire lead up?
    • He knows the end is near, doesn’t he? He knows what’s going on, he knows it has to happen. He lives with it. He’s a fatalist. Tom (Felton) can’t do it. He backs out. He can’t cope with it. And then it’s left to (Alan) Rickman, who enjoyed killing Dumbledore.
  • [laughs] I can imagine!
    • It’s good, rich stuff.
  • That one scene says so much about so many of the characters, it’s the linchpin of the series to me. We see Malfoy’s character and after the events of the 7th book play out and we see Snape’s backstory…
    • Yes. Good. I’ve never read one of the books. I just read the scripts. That’s all we’ve got, really, isn’t it? They’ve been discussing it here, downstairs, how you don’t really need to read the book if you’re in the film because so much of the story is cut, so it’s best just to stick to Steve Kloves’ words. There’s a lot of good subtext in it.
  • Have you read the script for the 7th movie?
    • No, I haven’t had it yet because I’m not wanted until next February. They’re shooting my bit after Christmas.
  • But you know how you play in the next movie, yeah?
    • I’m a ghost, is that right?
  • You’re also a painting, I think.
    • There’s a long scene as a ghost with Harry, where I appear to him.
  • It could have been very easy for JK Rowling to cop-out, but it would have taken everything away from your moment in this story if Dumbledore had just popped up fine and dandy in the next film. I’m glad she found a way to bring Dumbledore back into the story without taking anything away from his sacrifice.
    • Yeah, sure, sure. I’m glad as well because I need the money! (laughs)


Mike NewellEdit

Goblet of FireEdit

  • As one of the newcomers, what was it like to join this very successful production? Was it at all daunting?
    • It's very daunting to start with. The book's as big as a house brick and I was very unsure quite how one would attack it. But of course you come after these wonderful guys. You come after Chris Columbus and Alfonso Cuarón and you are guided through this minefield by David Heyman [producer]. Little by little you lose your terror of it. After a bit I think the thing itself just overwhelms you and what you do is you try to get from day to day and looking back, I'm terribly proud of it.
  • How did you find the balance between what to keep from the book and what to leave out?
    • [Producer] David [Heyman] was very clear to me when we first started to talk about making the film that if I could see a way of making it in one film, then we could continue to talk. If not, then we should part friends. There was a time when people were thinking about making two films. I read the book very carefully and I felt that there was a way of making one film, which was as a thriller. It was the fact that Voldemort played by Ralph Fiennes were really in charge of events from the very beginning and only little by little did Harry catch up with what was happening to him until it was too late. There he was, facing the devil in a graveyard. As soon as I could see that I felt that I could stay true to the book and keep the length down.
  • There has been a story in one paper that you were angered at the lack of cash to make the film. What's your take on that?
    • I'm terribly sorry but that was a vast piece of quoting out of context. What I said was that when I began, the sheer scale of the film was daunting. And then after a little bit, like every director, and in every film I've ever made, big or small, you feel that there isn't quite enough money to put the absolute top little bit of topspin on it. And, of course, you start to feel aggrieved that you have so little money. It was a monstrous nonsense.


Rade SerbedzijaEdit

Deathly HallowsEdit

  • How was it being involved in Harry Potter?
    • I liked the role and it seems to me that we captured it well. Although for me, no matter how talented the director and actors are in this story, this type of film does not interest me in particular. But it does my daughters, including Lucia, who were excited for me to shoot Harry Potter. Gregorovich's role is quite important because of him in it explains a lot. I have only scenes with Ralph Fiennes, which made me especially happy because he is an amazing actor, and also, somehow, we made friends.
  • Was it fun meeting you trio?
    • It was really fun for me to meet famous actors like Radcliffe, Grint and Tom Felton, who plays the villain Malfoy, screaming and singing: ' Boris the Blade.' That was my role in the film 'Snatch' by Guy Ritchie.


Richard HarrisEdit

Philosopher's StoneEdit

  • How do you cope with the weight of expectation on the film?
    • I don't think about it. If you start worrying about approval, you're going to get it wrong. Dumbledore is possibly the easiest part in the entire book because it's so well written. It's all done for you, and I think I avoided the temptation of saying, "Well this is Richard Harris's Dumbledore." I didn't want to do that because the part was already created, all I wanted to do as an actor was to embody it, and let it speak for itself.
  • So have you read the books?
    • I haven't, even today I haven't read them. Not because they're not grand, I know they're great. I love the script, but I don't read fiction, it's as simple as that. There's more fiction in my life than in books, so I don't bother with them.
  • What attracted you to the script?
    • I thought the script was wonderful if they could pull it off, which they did. The thing that slightly worried me is: I hate commitment of any kind - that's why I have two ex-wives! If David [Heyman, producer] and Chris [Columbus, director] decide to do the seven novels, I have to do all seven - and that's what scared me. I'd have to get their permission to do something else. I'm a bit rebellious by nature, and I found that rather difficult to handle. While this was all floating around the family, my granddaughter called me and said: "If you don't do Dumbledore, I'll never speak to you again." I guess that was enough.
  • Were you worried about the adage of working with children and animals?
    • I only worked with Dan [Radcliffe], but I was very envious of him and the other kids. Because their heads are in a place that we have grown out of. There is a place that's committed to fantasy, and their heads are in the right place, and their souls are in the right place. Dan was so instinctive, and so right.


Rik MayallEdit

Philosopher's StoneEdit

  • You was engaged to play Peeves, but his role ended up on the cutting room floor...
    • Yeah, but I got the cash: that's all that matters.
  • But you were invited to the premiere?
    • I was on stage with Ade (his old friend Adrian Edmondson) in Liverpool doing our Bottom tour at the time so I couldn't go. But mummy and the kids went. We didn't tell Bonnie I wasn't in it because we didn't want her to be disappointed. She thought Robbie (Coltrane) was me and that the make-up was brilliant. My wife says I should have played Gilderoy Lockhart in the new film.


Robbie ColtraneEdit

Philosopher's StoneEdit

  • Did your young son have any influence over your decision to play Hagrid?
    • He made it quite clear that if I didn't play the role, I would be dead within a week. As you can imagine, the guy who turned down Hagrid would be like the guy who called the Beatles a guitar band. So I couldn't possibly refuse, really.
  • How do you cope with the weight of expectation on the film?
    • I got a letter from this woman just before we started filming, and she said: "I'm really glad you're playing Hagrid, because the expectations of millions upon millions of children throughout the world will be resting upon your shoulders." So no pressure then! It's like driving a car. If you get in and think, If I turn the wheel now we'll all die, you'd never drive a car. You just give it your best shot. I think that's true of everybody in the film. Everyone was aware how important it was and what a big responsibility it was.
  • Is filming still a nerve-wracking experience for you?
    • I've been in this business for over 20 years, and it still scares the bejesus out of me walking onto a set for the first time. There's at least a 100 people you've never met before, and you think, This [scene] cost £5 million, I'd better get it right.
  • JK Rowling was very keen on you playing Hagrid. How did that make you feel?
    • I was terribly flattered, because by then I was a huge fan of the books. I always really liked Hagrid. I thought Hagrid was an interesting guy, he drives a motorcycle, and has his own place in the country.
  • You're going to be idolized by children all over the world after this. How are you going to react?
    • I'll have to cut down on being pictured staggering out of a nightclub at three in the morning. It is a bit of responsibility, I suppose, but I shall take it lightly.

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • Were you able to develop the character of Hagrid in the second movie?
    • The way the books are written, more and more is revealed about Hagrid as the books progress, because he has a very dark side. In this particular one he's in prison for most of the film, so there wasn't a huge character development. It was interesting going into his past, when we think he's the bad guy for a long time in the film, so I played a bit darker than I did in the previous one.
  • How did you find working with the kids again?
    • It's been an absolute nightmare! No, it was kind of like going back to school again, in a way. We were thinking, "What kind of mood is Dumbledore going to be in this term?" It was very strange going back to a familiar set but very easy, it's a very nice atmosphere.


Rupert GrintEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • How did you like the action scenes in the movie?
    • For me the stunts are so cool, they're one of my favourite things when we're doing the film. Doing the car scene was great, it was like being in a theme park ride.
  • Which scenes did you like filming most?
    • My favourite scene was the slug scene [in which Ron regurgitates giant slugs]. I loved doing that scene because I had all this different flavoured slug slime... there was chocolate, peppermint, orange, lemon, and it made them taste really nice.
  • What were the most challenging scenes for you?
    • The most challenging scene for me was the spider scene, because I don't like spiders in real life. Even rubber ones I get really scared of.
  • Would you say you and your character are alike?
    • We're both scared of spiders, that was probably the main thing I could relate to in this film. We've both got big families, too.
  • What was it like working with Kenneth Branagh?
    • I was a bit nervous at first working with him, but once I got talking to him, he was just so easy to talk to, really funny.

Prisoner of AzkabanEdit

  • What was it like seeing your faces on the big screen?
    • Yeah, it's really weird seeing yourself on the big screen - it's quite scary - but I've sort of got used to it now, it's quite cool.
  • How different was it working with Alfonso Cuarón compared to Chris Columbus?
    • It was a bit weird when we found out there was going to be a new director - we'd gotten really close to Chris, I was really used to him. But Alfonso was wicked, we had a really good time.
  • This time around we see you in jeans, more ordinary clothes. Were you relieved to be out of the school uniforms?
    • Unfortunately Ron still gets his hand-me-down Weasley sweaters, so I never got to experience the normal clothes.
  • How do you see your lives beyond the Harry Potter movies?
    • I'd like to carry on doing films - that would be pretty cool. But then, when I was a kid I wanted to be an ice cream man! That seemed like the ideal job for me.
  • Is there anything about filming you don't like?
    • I had a rat in this film. When we were in Scotland he peed on me. That wasn't really nice.
  • Alfonso asked you to write an essay about your characters' evolution. What did you write?
    • I forgot to do it... [laughter]
  • David Heyman [the producer] has said that you might end up too old for the parts one day. Would you mind, or would you want to get on with your lives and do other films?
    • I'd like to go on. I really do enjoy Ron, it's a really good experience.
  • Were you intimidated with working with such an amazing cast?
    • It's a bit scary when you first get to meet them but they are really just down to earth, easy to talk to people. That is one of the reasons I really enjoy acting - you get to meet all these cool people.

Goblet of FireEdit

  • How much do you think you have matured along with your character and did you make many suggestions to Mike Newell [the director] in terms of your own acting?
    • When I did the first film, I'd never done anything like it before and it was all a bit scary. Now I think we've all probably learned quite a lot since then. It's quite strange having a new director each time, you don't really know what to expect.


Shirley HendersonEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • Is Moaning Myrtle's voice based on anybody in particular?
    • No it's not based on anyone. It's just what came out of me, out of my head. I'd describe her voice as wounded. I did a lot of crying during the scenes and that aided that kind of gurgly quality I was trying to produce - as if she was choking on water all the time.
  • What advice did Chris Columbus give you?
    • Chris just told me to make it truthful. "If you believe it, they'll believe it," is what he said. But I didn't tell him the story about the ghost I saw!
  • Was playing Myrtle easier than playing a real person?
    • No, it was more difficult, mostly because of all the technical stuff it involved. I had to be strapped up to this harness so it looked as if I was flying and so I could be pushed through the air and twisted and turned over and over again. It's physically very tiring on your body. It also requires a lot of concentration, because there's all kinds of people shouting stuff like "Turn, do this, look at this" so they can do all their stuff with the computer effects while I'm trying to act it out. But once you block all that out, it's great fun. Really good fun.
  • Do you like seeing yourself on the big screen?
    • The first time is usually horrible. Even at the premiere, although I enjoyed it, you end up waiting to see if there's any more of you about to appear and going "Oh, that's what they were doing" as the special effects appear. It means you can't quite see the film for what it is right away.


Steve KlovesEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • Has that (the characters being violated) happened on any of the films?
    • There’s one moment in "The Chamber of Secrets" that I don’t like, where Hagrid enters Hogwarts at the end of the movie and the whole group of assembled students applaud him. That would not happen. And it really upset me. I felt it was a real violation of character. And that was odd because [director] Christopher Columbus is a Potter fiend. He carried the book around with him. You could never catch Chris on anything. But I think Chris felt that he wanted the release of that moment. It was a mild disagreement.

Order of the PhoenixEdit

  • Why didn't you decide to adapt "Order of the Phoenix"?
    • You know, I don’t even know why. The fourth film, "Goblet of Fire," was really hard to do. I wrote on it for two years. But it’s not that simple and I don’t know that I’ll ever fully understand why I didn’t do it. This will sound glib, but it’s somewhat true: They asked me on the wrong day. They asked me for the last time on the wrong day. Had they asked me the next day, I probably would have said yes. There’s always stuff that goes on around these movies and I felt an urge -- and I still feel an urge -- to do other things. To go back to making movies nobody wants to see, and I'll do so. But I think I was feeling that urge particularly keenly at that time. I always said too that if the kids left, I would leave too. And there was some talk about Emma Watson [who plays Hermione] leaving and that would have been hard for me if Emma had left because I like writing for the three kids.


Half-Blood PrinceEdit

  • Do you work with Rowling when you’re hammering out a script, or do you have total freedom to adapt as you please?
    • I’m a little too free. Jo’s become a really good friend, one of my best friends, and I wish I had more of her. When I first got to know Jo, she wasn’t married, and now she is married and has kids, so she’s gotten a much bigger life. Now, we mostly correspond through e-mail, and she’s very responsive and very helpful, but from the beginning she has always said to me, "I know the movies will be very different. I know they can’t be the books, and I don’t want them to be the books. The only thing that matters to me is that you stay true to the characters." So that’s always been the one thing I feel very much in charge of, protecting the characters, and it’s the thing that upsets me the most when I feel the characters are being violated. That’s when I push back hard.
  • What kind of things do you run by Rowling?
    • A range of things, even something really simple. I once asked about the 12 uses of dragon’s blood, which is referenced in the books. There are writers who would write “12 uses of dragon’s blood” and not have a clue what they are; it just sounds cool. But I emailed her to ask (and this was 10 years ago), and 25 seconds later I get an email back with a list.
  • Do tell. She's only mentioned "oven cleaner" in interviews.
    • One is an oven cleaner, yes. Another is a spot remover. . . . It was really amazing. Really, the books are only the thinnest surface of what she knows about the series. Where Jo is helpful in a more serious way for me is when I want to know more about motivation or background, when Harry realized certain things, when characters understood things. There was one case where I was violating a plot thing -- it had something to do with Dobby, I think -- and she said, "No, you don’t want to do that," as she knew what was to come. She’s a great resource for problem solving and she has such a facile mind, she can help with complicated things. Though her plots are so fiendish that they’re really difficult for cinema.
  • What, if anything, can you say about the climactic moment between Snape and Dumbledore? In the book, it’s a short but intense scene.
    • It is informed by everything [Potter readers] have come to know is true. So if you watch the film carefully, there are performance moments that are quite extraordinary, Alan Rickman [who plays Snape] especially. There is something we added that you can look forward to, a short scene between Harry and Snape prior to the big event. It’ll be interesting to see how it plays to the audience. It should be a haunting moment for Harry. While I was writing, I just had a notion about a moment between him and Snape, something Harry could look back on and question as to why he didn’t act differently.
  • I’ve also read that most of Dumbledore's pensive memories of young Voldemort, then Tom Riddle, have been cut from the film. (Not to mention: Dumbledore's funeral!)
    • In my original draft, I had every single memory but one, I believe. I even dramatized a couple of things that weren’t in the book in terms of Voldemort, like the death of Tom’s parents, things like that. I'm a Harry Potter fan, so my first drafts tend to reflect that, in that they tend to be long and all-inclusive. When [director] David Yates came in, he had a very specific point of view, which was that he wanted to showcase Voldemort’s rise without getting overly involved with his past as Riddle. He didn’t think that most of the memories would be as compelling on-screen as they are on the page. He liked them in the script, but he really felt that in the movie experience Voldemort’s story was more important than young Riddle‘s. We went back and forth on that for quite a bit. But he was very convincing, and I think it wound up working out well.
  • Are there any other changes or additions that you can talk about?
    • I know one thing David is very proud of is getting Quidditch right. I do think it’s the first time that it feels like a sport. And it’s comic, which is fun. Rupert Grint [who plays Ron] is great. We also do a lot with the kids coming of age, navigating sexual politics and all that. It’s pretty interesting to see these characters doing that because the movies have always been a bit chaste, and they continue to be on some level, but there’s more happening in this one. You realize how complicated it is between boys and girls. It’s a lot of fun seeing Ron navigate his first girlfriend.
  • Speaking of . . . how does the coming together of Ginny and Harry play out when we've all fallen for Cho Chang in the previous films?
    • It’s interesting in the way it’s played out. I’m very happy with the moment they consummate their feelings. It was a nice scene and David did it really well. It’s sweet. For any longtime Potter fan, it's now that you begin to see people coming together, but in doing so, it strains the old relationships and the relationships that are the truest and the most trusted. That’s potentially dangerous, but it’s also a part of growing up. You have to strain those relationships to realize how important they are.
  • What is it like to have stuck with the Harry Potter series for so long?
    • It’s complicated. When I said yes to the first film, the only thing I was told was that the books were "kind of a big deal in the U.K." No one here had heard of it, except people with kids of a certain age. I do wonder what I would have done in this last decade if I hadn‘t done "Potter." The last thing I did was "Wonder Boys" [released in 2000] and that’s kind of where I left off, like I said, being involved with movies no one wants to see. Pretty much my career before Potter. I wonder what movies I would have made at 35 and 40 years old. I’m glad I did Potter, but I can’t say these things haven’t crossed my mind, the sacrifice I made to do it.
  • How satisfied are you with the finished film?
    • I haven’t seen the final version. It was not fully scored when I saw it. But I liked what I saw a lot. It’s quite powerful, and genuinely moving at times. Even at times people might not expect. There are some intense emotional moments. It feels more mature. I’m very excited about the next two movies because they’re even more mature and the kids are older. "Half-Blood Prince" is quite a leap from "Order of the Phoenix." It’s quite different. It’s not an action movie in the same way. But the last two films will be hugely different from all that have preceded them.


Tom FeltonEdit

Chamber of SecretsEdit

  • What was the best thing about working on "Harry Potter"?
    • Finishing it! It's one of those things where you go, "Thank god it's all over!" and then you get to see the final production. But working with everyone else was great fun. Working with big actors and realising that they were just normal people who've got an incredible talent was just a great experience.
  • How much gel do you have to put in your hair?
    • Tell me about it! It's not gel, it's cement! About a pot a day.
  • Is it fun playing a baddie?
    • Definitely. It felt a bit different really, because when you think of "Harry Potter", you think it's a nice children's film starring nice characters. But I'm the one that goes against all that. But I think Draco is always going to be a real nasty little snob really!
  • Do you think that Harry and Draco can ever be friends?
    • Hopefully not, it'll ruin my part! No definitely not, I couldn't see it happening.
  • What was it like working with Daniel Radcliffe?
    • He's a very mischievous child. He was always causing havoc. He's on-set the most and so I think he has to keep himself entertained by doing all this stuff - borrowing people's mobile phones and setting the language to Turkish and all kinds of stuff like that. He loves it.
  • Did you find the finished film frightening?
    • Too right! It was really bad, actually - everyone thinks I'm the dark hard man and I'm like "uugh!" All those snakes jumping out all over the place and everything!
  • Have you seen the Draco action figure yet?
    • Yes, my friends bought it as soon as they saw it and snapped my arms off and bent my legs every way possible - so that was good fun!


Zoë WanamakerEdit

Philosopher's StoneEdit

  • Zoë, you were in Harry Potter, weren't you?
    • Yes.
  • That must have been lovely.
    • Yes, it was. It was great fun.
  • But how did they do all the flying bits in it?
    • Basically, you have to sit on a bicycle seat and then get strapped in to a safety harness. And then this machine - it had a broomstick on it... And so the computer knows exactly what moves it's going to do. So your broomstick can go down, or it can go up, or it can go sideways, but it's programmed in. The day I went on it, it broke down, and it went down like this [leans forward sharply]! Then I had to go to the canteen and have something to eat while they fixed it. And then I had to go back in again.
  • Wow. What did you have to eat?
    • I've forgotten.
  • Speaking of Mrs Hooch, can we just kill this one -
    • Madam Hooch, Madam Hooch, please.
  • Madam Hooch. Speaking as Madam Hooch - this big debate [about] whether the broomsticks go brush first or brush backwards - what's your take on this?
    • Brush backwards, of course. Otherwise, you'll go backwards!
  • All these white witches said the film was wrong, that actually the brush of the broom for a witch should be at the front.
    • [Laughs] Oh, I didn't go into research that hard about which way it should go!

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